Q&A: Where Are Your Clothes Made?

We've been asked often enough where the modern vintage inspired clothes we carry are made that it warranted it's own post.

savadyblog is an online boutique and retailer and all of the modern/new clothing we carry are sourced from over 100 different brands we work with. We do not produce or manufacture any of our own garments... but perhaps someday (one can dream!) we will and we will be absolutely honored to share the journey and process with you.

Our product listings will say whether a garment is made in the USA or Imported. For Imported products, most often the garments are produced in China. Other items may be produced in Mexico or India. Because the garments are not produced for savadyblog or by savadyblog, we do not have access to the factory information each individual brand we work with uses.

For a bit more insight on my experiences working at a clothing production company in Los Angeles (that was my full time before savadyblog became my full time job *hehe*) read this blog post: Where are your modern vintage inspired clothes made?

A note from Rodellee

Hello kind inquisitive mind!

As the owner, founder, and buyer for savadyblog I take great thought and care about every single decision I make for my company. Ask any one of my employees... I mull and ruminate over everything! Choosing the styles for the shop and deciding which brands to work with... it all matters and I take it all very seriously. I constantly check in with my conscience at so many different points in my business and the decisions I make. Maybe it's because I grew up with an Asian and Catholic mother...

I have met with a representative of every single brand we work with, sometimes even met with the owners and the lead designers. Modern clothes are a new addition to savadyblog and it is very important to me that I foster and maintain relationships with our brands as much as I do with our customers. Sometimes I will give suggestions to brands on making better fabric choices, design and construction elements, and details to omit so a garment can be wearable for more seasons. (And it's so exciting when I see the next season release and seeing small changes made!)

I wish I could guarantee the working conditions of every factory the clothes we carry come from, but that's nearly impossible. What I can do is build trusting relationships with our brands and if something feels off and doesn't sit right with our company ethos or mission (or I can hear my mother going "tsk tsk Anak...) then I can express my concerns with the brand, see if changes can be made, and if not, be ok to no longer work with the brand. 

We all have the freedom to choose where and how we shop for our garments. Hours are spent searching for garments for savadyblog! I try to only select garments made of cotton, linen, rayons, and higher quality polyesters while also keeping prices approachable and sustainable for my small business. The modern clothing you will find at savadyblog will have a nod to the past and reference styles of 10+ years of antique and vintage clothing I sold. I select styles that are feminine and timeless so you can wear them year after year without having to constantly update and rehaul your closet because of fast fashion trends. 

Have you checked out other shops lately with polyester tops for $168? I'm looking at you Anthropologie. Or thin rayon dresses Made in China available at Nordstroms for $195 though the brand speaks heavily about how eco they are? Talking about The Reformation... Be wary of companies that are greenwashing and companies trying to jump on the eco/ethics of fashion bandwagon.  

You should be asking these questions about where your garments are made and the message brands put out there and if their message lines up with their business practices. Then check in with your own inner moral compass and base your buying decision on that.

It's important to support small businesses that are genuinely trying to make a positive impact on the world. I know that's why you're here reading this, you're trying too. And I think that's really swell of you!

Sincerely,

Rodellee Bas

Founder, Owner, and Buyer of savadyblog